Q: Is it possible to defer STAT 200 to 3rd year as a Science student?

It used to state explicitly on the Science website that you need to complete all 9 computational credits before heading into your third year, unless you’re in Biology and you’re required to take BIOL 300. I can’t find the statement anymore on the website or the calendar. 

http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/vancouver/index.cfm?tree=12,215,410,1467#18475

It just says that you can delay 3 credits of lower-level requirements until your third year, so if you’re only missing the 3 computational requirements, I think you’ll be okay! Double check with a science advisor though, now is a good time to do it as their office isn’t as busy now! =P 


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Q: Do you think a 4 hour break is long? I could move this course to 9:00 but I'm a 2 1/2 hour commuter so I don't know if it's worth it. If I do move it, then I don't have to wait 4 hours for my class and can just go home. Thanks! (Also, do you have any suggestions of what I should do during the 4 hours?

It is a long break, but to commute 2.5 hours for a 9 AM class is just brutal. I would just take that 4 hour break and do some productive studying or get all your internet procrastination stuff out of the way =P. 


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Q: What do most students take to meet the remaining 3 computational credits after first year math (6 credits)?

Most of them do a STAT course, I did BIOL 300, which is equivalent to STAT 200 and since I was a Biology major I was allowed delay the last 3 computational credits until my third year since BIOL 300 is required. Normally, you need to finish all 9 credits by the end of your second year. 

CPSC courses count too, I know people who took CPSC 101 to meet the computational requirement, it’s known as a GPA booster because it an introductory computer course where you learn about the internet and folders…=P. Keep in mind, if you do any other CPSC course, you will lose credit for CPSC 101 if you take it. 


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Q: Hello, I'm entering first year science and thinking of deferring my integral calculus (Math 103) to second year. Have you heard of anyone doing this before and is it odd? Other than that I'm taking all the general science courses for first year. Also, I plan to major in either biology or CAPS.

As long as you meet promotion requirements and specialization admission pre-reqs, you should be good! I have a friend in Biology who took Math 105 in the summer after first year. 


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Q: hi, do you remember if the biol 204 final is cumulative?

It depends on your prof, my friends’ exams were cumulative while mine was focused more on post-midterm material. 


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Q: Hey! For the English courses that you took, were they writing intensive or more reading based?

It was definitely more reading base with a few assignments here and there. 


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Public Transit Survival Tips & Twitter

- from a Burnaby commuter who spent 2+ hours in the last 4 years on the bus to get to and from UBC…and will continue to do so until further notice…-_- #iamubc

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Q: Hello, I was looking at the fees that we can opt-out from calendar[.]ubc[.]ca /vancouver /index[.]cfm?tree =14,267,784,0 and wondering if there are any consequences from opting out of stuff like the ubyssey publication fee, ciTR radio... etc. it's not like I cant read the ubyssey newspaper if I opt out right? And what is that radio even for? Thanks!

There aren’t any consequences to opting out of those services, it’s just a hassle to have to go to each individual office and fill out a form haha…=P


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Q: Hello, I was wondering, do most health/science/lab specific jobs after university care about what major you were or rather do they look at the courses you took and any extra-curricular activities/ research and experiences you've had? For example If I was in Integrated sciences and essentially took most of the same courses as a Biology major, would they look at the two majors similarly?..On the other hand I know that graduate programs don't care what you majored in as long as you meet the prereqs

Sometimes they prefer certain majors but you have the freedom to take any courses you want, especially if you’re in Integrated Sciences. You can take all the same labs as students in BIology or Biochemistry, in order to gain the skills you need for certain jobs.

People care more about your skills and not so much your major. Sometimes the specialization you graduate with is a good indication of the type of skill-set you might possess, but it doesn’t mean you took all the courses or gained the experience that the employer is looking for. 

I work in Web Development/Design and Communications, but the job posting said they preferred a Computer Science or Marketing student, I got the job anyway even though I studied Biology. 


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